Exclusive: Sean Zevran Talks Philosophy, Barebacking, And Why He Prefers Working With Gay Men Over Straight Men

Posted July 31, 2014 by with 44 comments

tumblr_mwnh5vYXKq1rxaro0o1_400

He’s easily one of the most physically flawless gay porn stars to emerge in recent years, but Falcon’s new exclusive Sean Zevran is a lot more than just a pretty face (and a pretty ass, and a pretty body, and a pretty cock). Underneath the physique is a philosopher and intellectual with a lot on his mind and a lot to say–and I’m thrilled Sean Zevran said some of it to me in this Str8UpGayPorn exclusive interview.

sean zevran 1Str8UpGayPorn: Hi Sean! For those who don’t know, give us some quick background info. Where were you raised, how old are you, and what’s your ethnic background?
Sean Zevran: I was raised in the Piney Woods of East Texas, though I currently reside in Dallas, Texas. I’m 26 years old, and I’m half black and half white.

Have you always been in such incredible shape?
I don’t think there has been a point in my life in which I haven’t been physically active in some form or fashion: When I was a little kid, I would always run to get from point A to point B, never walking to get anywhere I had to go; I ran track and cross-country in middle and high school, and after high school I enlisted in the Marine Corps Reserve and started hitting the gym hard in college.

What role does porn play in keeping up your appearance?
I definitely became more self conscious when I got into porn, that’s for sure. Being in the spotlight has exacerbated every physical insecurity I’ve ever had. This is a double-edged sword: on the one hand, it’s motivation to push harder than ever inside the gym and maintain dietary discipline; on the other hand, it can be pretty stressful, especially when I know I have a scene coming up and I feel like I’m not looking my best.

sean zevran 5

Do you ever get tired of being sexually objectified? Are people able to appreciate you for what’s on the “inside”?
Well, as I mentioned, it can be pretty stressful anytime I have a scene, photo shoot or club appearance and I feel like I’m not looking my best. That can get tiresome, but I don’t mind being objectified; it’s the nature of the job. I just want to make sure I’m good at my job. I do get tired of the vitriol that gets thrown my way. People can be so hateful, and there’s a lot of ignorance out there. I mean I knew this before getting into porn, but I guess I was a bit naïve in the sense I didn’t expect it to be as bad as it is sometimes. There is still a stigma attached to the sex industry, and those of us in the industry have to put up with a lot of prejudice and stereotypes. And, of course, there is the familiar stereotype that most pretty people are stupid, despite data to the contrary floating around out there.

You seem pretty level-headed about it all. How do you not let it get it you?
One of the ways I deal with this is I’ve sort of taken it upon myself to use my life experiences and skills as a writer and a speaker to really reach out to the audience. For example, I have a BA in philosophy, and most people don’t think about it this way but there is a philosophical element to the sex industry and the role sex plays in our society. The philosophy of sex is a topic dating back to antiquity, beginning with philosophers such as Plato, Aristotle and St. Augustine up to contemporary philosophers such as Kant, Freud and Russell, and today’s notable philosophers of sex, such as Alan Soble and Judith Butler.

Some people don’t realize that porn stars don’t just pop up out of thin air without any background or personal history.
I have a diverse background. I grew up a country boy in East Texas, I served in the military, I have a degree in philosophy with a minor in economics; I’ve been a dancer, escort, porn star, and I’ve experienced all manner of things in between these two radically different cultures. I recently started a blog, JosiahJennings.com, which I operate under my real name, and I share my experiences and insights on a variety of issues. It’s still a work in progress, but my hope is to provide a unique perspective of the sex industry and eventually branch out into other areas.

Sean-Zevran-and-Andrew-Jakk-Randy-Blue-gay-porn-reverse-wheelbarrow-7-e1375777206913How did you get into the business? Did you apply to Randy Blue and other studios, or did people recruit you?
I had just finished up my last final back in undergrad school and a friend of mine by the name of Brandon Wilde—I’m sure most of your readers know him—he called me and told me that he had submitted my contact info and some of my photos to Randy Blue. Sure enough, Randy Blue called me that evening, and it wasn’t long before I was being flown to LA to shoot my first scene.

How long were you there before moving over to Falcon?
After two years with Randy Blue, whose staff became like a family to me, I thought it had come time to branch out. I applied to many different companies earlier this year, and Falcon was the first to get back to me. After working with some of their models and staff and speaking to Chris Ward, I could immediately tell that Falcon and Raging Stallion were going to be my new home. I’m excited about what is to come.

Who do you think your best work was with during your time at Randy Blue, and what about at Falcon?
Well, I never watch my scenes, so I’m not sure from a consumer point of view. But I think I enjoyed working with Diego Sans, Adi Hadad, and Austin Wolf the most while I was with Randy Blue. At Falcon, it’s way too early to tell. So far, only two of my scenes have been released. I think the ones I’m most excited about are my scenes with Luke Adams, Topher DiMaggio and Lance Luciano.

sean zevran 3

One of the big topics everyone still loves to argue about is “gay-for-pay” performers. How have your experiences been working with gay-for-payers? What do you think of the notion that straight guys shouldn’t be working in gay porn and taking jobs away from actual gay men?
Yeah, it’s been a big topic, and frankly people need to drop this issue and find something better to talk about. First, gay-for-pay performers aren’t going anywhere. There is a market for gay-for-pay, and most of them are very good at their job. Now, as a gay performer, I prefer my co-workers to be gay, also. I feel more comfortable working with other gay guys. Having said that, however, I have never had a problem with any of the gay-for-pay performers I have worked with. I just say I prefer my co-workers to be gay because I am very flirty on set, and it helps me to better do my job when I can create some sexual chemistry. But gay-for-pay performers aren’t taking jobs away from gay men; that’s an asinine assumption. This is a trivial issue.

sean zevran bareback
Earlier this year, photos of you having bareback sex were circulating on Twitter and the blogs. Did you post those with the intention to stir up debate, or did you just think they were hot pictures and not really mean anything by it?
I posted [those] mostly for shits and giggles. Yeah, I thought the photo was hot, but I knew once Twitter and the blogs got a hold of it that it would create a frenzy—everything from lust to moral outrage. It was all very predictable. Sometimes I get bored and like to antagonize the masses.

And what about barebacking in gay porn? Would you ever do it, and what do you think of its rise in gay adult films?
I’ve written at length about it in an article titled “Porn and Barebacking,” but the short answer is I oppose barebacking in porn about as much as I oppose violence on television and in video games, which is very little to none. I think the focus should be on education and access to resources in our communities rather than condemning porn companies and models that decide to do bareback. I once had reservations about doing bareback porn myself, but in becoming more informed and with medical advancements like PrEP those reservations aren’t as great and I don’t rule out doing bareback in the future. Yes, I realize there is still risk involved and that PrEP is not a replacement for condoms, but I think that is a personal choice I should be able to make without moral condemnation.

sean zevran 4I was gonna ask you about Truvada. What do you think of it?
This is another topic I’ve written about. Truvada as PrEP is an invaluable tool in the fight against HIV. Obviously, it’s not intended as a replacement for condoms, but combating HIV/AIDS requires a multifaceted approach and this is a weapon we so desperately need. We need every tool at our disposal.

The mandatory condoms law in California looks like it’ll probably pass later this summer. What do you make of government having this kind of control over an industry?
Well, government is involved in all economic activity, but I think many of the regulations of the sex industry—not just the mandatory condoms law—are poor governing. Porn companies are abandoning California in droves and the state is driving billions of dollars out of its economy. Though, that doesn’t surprise me coming from California—it’s the worst managed state in the whole fucking country. Of course I disagree with the law, but that’s California’s problem. I’m still employed.

sean zevran 2

I’ve heard some performers admit that having so much sex for work has desensitized them to sex in their personal lives. Has that been an issue for you? How do you keep things “fresh” and interesting in your personal life?
I don’t know that I’d be having any more or less sex if I were not in porn than I have currently being in porn. I know people outside of porn that have much more sex than I do. It just so happens that sometimes my sex gets filmed and I get paid for it. I only film a few times per month, which doesn’t significantly affect my overall sex life. So, that hasn’t been a problem for me.

What is one thing you like to do sexually that you’ve never been able to do in one of your porn scenes?
For once, I’d love to have a guy that’s wholly my type that’s very into me as well and with whom I can be really passionate and not worry about some director telling me what to do every thirty seconds. That is, the director just films us going at it however we choose and there’s not a bunch of stopping and going and retakes. Unfortunately, that’s just part of the job; things don’t flow nearly as smooth behind the scenes as they would seem in the final product.

Sean-Zevran-and-Adam-Ramzi-flip-fuck-for-the-gay-porn-film-Stunners-from-the-Falcon-Edge-branch-of-Falcon-Studios-16Sean-Zevran-and-Adam-Ramzi-flip-fuck-for-the-gay-porn-film-Stunners-from-the-Falcon-Edge-branch-of-Falcon-Studios-19

You have performed as both a bottom and top, but do you have a preference in your personal life?
I definitely prefer performing as a bottom. It’s much easier. Performing as a top is so physically demanding. Plus, I put a lot of work into my legs and ass and want to see them put to good use. In my personal life, I considered myself more of a bottom in the past, but now I’m not so sure. I’m definitely versatile, but I’ve hardly bottomed at all in the last few months. I tend to go through phases, though. Essentially, it just depends on chemistry.

Do you have a boyfriend now? What do you look for?
I do not have and have never had a boyfriend. I’m in love with the idea of companionship, but it hasn’t happened so far. There are no particular qualities I look for in a partner. Looking for specific qualities and comparing every potential partner to some abstract ideal, I think, can be limiting. I try to be open-minded and just go with the flow. Of course, I have certain characteristics and physical attributes toward which I tend to gravitate, but I am not exclusively seeking out these things.

Is there any type of performance in porn that you absolutely will NOT do?
I’m not into fisting and watersports yet, but at the rate I’m going…sheesh. There’s no telling what all I’ll be into in a few years.

We’ll be waiting to see what happens! Thanks, Sean!

Bj5gJFtCYAAklHL.jpg_large[Falcon Studios: Sean Zevran]

[Randy Blue: Sean Zevran]

  • sxg

    “But gay-for-pay performers aren’t taking jobs away from gay men; that’s an asinine assumption. This is a trivial issue.”

    Some heads are exploding because of that comment. Not mine though he makes some good points on the subject.

    • n24rc

      I never took the discussion about G4P about jobs – it was about the hetero-normative roles and homophobic connotations from it. That straight guys only top. Some guys who don’t kiss or do ANY of the things that make up gay sex, and they are still working in porn. You are getting paid to do this work, just like the gay guys, and they never complain about not being attracted to scene partners(which is common in porn).

      Despite the fact I don’t like Sean from what I’ve seen online and his interactions with people,(chalk it up to not knowing him personally, if you will), he has delivered good performances in porn. I don’t complain about his looks or performances – even if Sean can be an asshole sometimes. Personality is irrelevant, if the model does hard work and makes a serious effort.

      I think it is a fair statement to say some guys aren’t living up to the bar because they don’t get called out on it – G4P in my view is about this issue and nothing more.

      • This Me

        Uh…gay porn actors complain about their scene partners. And plenty G4P str8 porn actors do bottom.

        Never mind. It’s pretty clear from your reply that you don’t know what you’re talking about. I won’t bother w/the rest. LOL

        • n24rc

          name them or STFU (won’t bother = don’t know). And if you don’t care, then what was the purpose of the response in the first place?

          • This Me

            I like making fun of idiots like you who leave comments on the Internet. I’m not worried about proving that I’m right – especially when it’s patently obvious like now.

          • n24rc

            Your name and id was created just days ago. This tells me you lack balls, and that you could be one of the few people in the industry who visit blogs to leave comments with different alias. You are pathetic.

            I’ve sufficiently proven my points with links, and because you can’t prove contrary to them, your only last resort is to berate me; this means that you lack any comprehension of what I’ve said to begin with.

            Unless you have something else to say, “This Me” – you can just “Blow Me.”

          • This Me

            oh no, i’m not in the industry. and i read good so i definitely understood your points. they weren’t worthy of comment so i didn’t want to respond to the content but instead chose to ridicule you openly. and i’ve left comments here before under another name which i couldn’t recall so i signed in using a new name. i don’t do so regularly b/c i think commenting like this on the internet is pretty asinine. even reading them is pretty low which shows just how low i am this week. hopefully next week will be better and i’ll go back to laughing and pointing at you commenters w/o actually responding myself. b/c, really, y’all are mostly idiots.

          • n24rc

            ” and i’ve left comments here before under another name which i couldn’t recall so i signed in using a new name.” – Now, who is the idiot? Discuss (which is used on multiple sites, which only requires one login) has a retrieve function. Nice convenient excuse though.

  • Pascal

    Porn performers still think that there are “billions of dollars” in it? In 2014? In California alone? Woa!

    I think someone is being a little too naive here.

    • When one accounts for how much money the companies, the employees themselves and their families spend in the economy, and then you take that cash-flow out of the economy, yes, the government is driving billions of dollars out of the economy when it causes an industry to pick up and move states.

      • Pascal

        Thanks for engaging in this discussion. How many people are in the Californian porn industry? The “billions” quote make it sound like hundreds of thousands. Are we sure that there are more staff and crew working in the industry than there are models? Prima facie I’d hope there are more models than staff and crew or the production/distribution pipeline is seriously screwed up.

        I didn’t know that the ‘nuclear family’ model was still the majority for people working in the porn business (I understand that it’s just not performers but still. When lurking on straight porn blogs, studio chiefs don’t seem to have the most stable of lives). So I don’t know if including families was the right call to make.

        Or if said families would move out of California when performers for example could just hop on a plane to LV which seems to be the preferred destination of studios afraid of condoms/performer databases.

        I also thought that all the porn conglomerates (Manwin, etc) were very careful in their financial structuring to make sure that all that good money was siphoned off-shore where the California government, and Uncle Sam even, couldn’t touch it. Especially since the virtual disappearance of physical distribution of porn.

        So doubtful about the “billions” even with your explanation. Still sounds like some nice bit of lobbying power-play to me.

        • Well, I’ll put it this way: When I’m doing a normal duo shoot, there are anywhere from three to five staff members just on set (in addition to the models, and I know quite a few that have nice, stable families), then you throw in editing staff, marketing staff, management, maintenance… depending on the size of the company. It varies, of course. I know many companies of this size that have fled to Vegas and other close sanctuaries.

          I’m not going to go back and forth about this, but… your posts, and many of the more virulent, are rife with judgment. That’s what 90% of comments on blogs are — people telling porn models and staff what horrible people we are. No one really wants a genuine conversation or learning experience out of this. At least not in my experience.

          • n24rc

            Nevada has legalized sex work- for which the state regulates. Las Vegas it is illegal.

            Brothels operate under a similar model for which porn productions work – the sex workers are considered independent contractors.

            A bit dated, but a decent read about the topic of condom use in sex work:
            http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1508424/

            I doubt it be long before Nevada would consider a measure for porn as well.

          • AlwaysUPaustin

            Incredible interview and thanks for your additional comments Sean. I have to say I find it very interesting that there are comments questioning the economic impact of porn in California with a member of the adult industry who has also studied economics…If I were the type to give the benefit of the doubt to anyone it would be you Sean. That being aid, all one has to do is a cursory web search about the economic impact the adult industry has in California to know it is huge. Thank you for calling out what these posts tend to be as well…Haters are gonna hate, regardless of facts.

          • Pascal

            48 hours later and I’m still trying to find anything in my comments that’s judgmental of you or your line of work in general. The most “virulent” term I’ve written is “naive“.

            Disagreeing about what the amount of money porn contributes to the Californian economy is not hating on you or your chosen profession.

          • Yes, you did accuse me of being naive, by which I’m not particularly bothered. And I said many of the more virulent posts, not necessarily implying yours was just then virulent or has been. However, the majority of comments I ever read on porn blogs are condescending, sanctimonious and often time just downright hateful. I sensed a bit of condescension in your post but nothing worth getting upset over. The nuance often is that porn stars are dumb and impulsive sex-driven individuals who couldn’t possibly know anything about anything. It’s part of the stigma and stereotypes I briefly touch on in this interview.

            Getting on a soapbox for a moment: The only reason I agree to do interviews like this is so that fans or anyone interested can learn more about me, but one of the reasons I also hate doing them is that most of the people who comment on blogs are commenting just to be an asshole and defame the character of models. I tell myself this is just a sampling bias that doesn’t accurately represent the entire audience, and that most people seem to appreciate it but don’t bother to comment. I say this given the amount of praise I get elsewhere that isn’t posted on blogs. My thing is… I understand I’m not everyone’s cup of tea–that some models are and some aren’t–but when that’s the case, why not just politely move on? One doesn’t have to call a model stupid, ugly, fat, skinny, etc. I’m speaking in general now, not directing all this at you.

            Going back to the economic discussion: When I say billion-dollar industry, it’s perhaps misleading. I’m not talking about the revenue generated just from porn consumption. I’ll admit the figure is likely overstated–there’s no good data out there–but when you consider how many companies have jumped up and moved out of state (there are many), then considering the entire impact of pushing an industry out of state is going to be quite high. I know a good chunk of the staffs from certain companies picked up and moved to Vegas 1) because it was often cheaper to live in Vegas; and 2) because they’re already guaranteed a job there. I was a bit surprised myself. Regardless of the exact figure, I don’t see a legitimate argument for many of the laws (not just condom laws) California is trying to pass to regulate the sex industry. For me, the benefit of passing these laws would have to be quite high in order for me to be convinced. I am not, however, convinced by the premise of employee safety. I believe that’s only the pretense.

            Gee, that was a tad bit long. Excuse the tangential soapbox. Anyway…

          • Pascal

            I can just picture Zach staring in disbelief at this exchange, amazed at how cordial it has remained.

            As, sadly shaking his head, he trashes the post headlined “Sean Zevran loses his damn mind in SUGP comments” he had gleefully prepared in advance. 😀

          • A.C.

            I am curious, how great would the benefit need to be in order for you to be convinced? More importantly, why does the benefit have to be comparatively great at all? What if the benefit only provides relative gains? To me, putting on a condom (albeit several times during the course of a shoot) and purchasing the same, seems like such an insignificant exercise compared to the benefit (or relative benefit) of providing yet another layer of prophylaxis to you and your fellow performers. I am even more curious to know why a work place safety law that is mandated in every other employment area that deals with the handling of potentially infectious materials is somehow a cover for a presumed moral crusade when it comes to the AFI. Granted, there is a history of just these sort of actions against the industry, but I am not sure that I see the evidence for that in this case. I am interested in understanding though.

          • n24rc

            I think it is fair to say at various points your perceived bias creates (your) bias. I also think bias is bidirectional, and often is overly positive and praiseful for attractive people. It has been shown numerous times in studies.

            Links:

            https://sites.google.com/site/thepsychofsocialpsychology/classical-studies/the-halo-effect

            http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/BF00287500

      • n24rc

        California’s economy is stagnant, porn tax dollars wouldn’t do any damage that wasn’t already there.

        I think porn companies need to come up with a better argument than first amendment protections(for which bareback doesn’t fall under) or tax dollars that wouldn’t matter in the grand scheme.

        I view porn like any other business, and it should be treated as such.

        I think it is fair to require to employers, whatever the industry, to ensure the safety of employees.

        • This isn’t about employee safety; this is about a moral crusade in the name of employee safety. Granting, for the sake of argument, that no direct damage is done to the overall California economy, this is a blow to both employers and employees in the industry. The costs outweigh the benefit.

          We’re not the ones that need to come up with an argument here. Because the sex industry still possesses a stigma, we’re easy scapegoats for sanctimonious politicians, but most of us want nothing to do with this “employee safety”.

          • n24rc

            The usage of “we’re” is of which party you are speaking for? The employer who hires you, or the peers who may silently object or feel they cannot ask for condoms on set?

            I think the right of the performer is of importance – as he or she should not be refused the right to ask for a condom on set, or not be able to get work because the competitiveness of the industry. Straight Industry Models are continuously pressured into condomless work because they are not empowered enough to do so.

    • moondoggy

      Re: billions of dollars, maybe that’s overstated, but when you think about how many ways sex can be monetized beyond just shooting scenes, his point should be well taken.

      • n24rc

        Yes. But the sextoy industry isn’t being regulated here – the issue of condom usage in predominantly straight productions is. Very different then what you are suggesting.

        • moondoggy

          All I’m suggesting is that if the entire porn industry moved from California to New York or elsewhere, that would be a very significant financial loss. To argue otherwise is illogical.

          I’m not trying to get you to agree with bareback sex, which it sounds like you’re opposed to. If you think it should be regulated or even prevented altogether, that’s a reasonable opinion to which you are entitled. But trivializing the financial impact of the porn industry is not going to make that persuasive — it’s persuasive only if you’re arguing that the health and safety of the workforce should be more important and worth the sacrifice.

          • n24rc

            California has a GDP a little over 1 trillion, with diverse industries such as Agriculture, Tourism, and Energy…. Entertainment is a smaller slice, of which, porn doesn’t make the majority. It would be like less than .4 in California if you assume that it makes the billions purported(however, this is if the entire porn industry is housed in Cali-for which it is not).

            There are major threats to the Cali economy other than a condom law…for instance a major drought affecting Agriculture, the fact that people are earning less -tourism downfalls, and energy which has issues of policy rather than consumption.

            Not to mention major Tech hubs such as Silicon Valley. So your points about economic impact are really simplistic for California. Even if it was focused to only the Los Angeles area, this past year only 40 film permits were done – there wasn’t a major impact from a reduced productions.

          • moondoggy

            To quote a character in the film Jackie Brown, “Half a million dollars will always be missed.” The flaw in your logic here is that the economy of a state is not like someone’s retirement portfolio. Yes, when you’re looking at it on a ledger, “0.4” would be insignificant. But (A) it’s not just numbers on a ledger. If the unemployment rate went down 0.4 percent last quarter, that might be trivial to you, but it’s not trivial to the 0.4 who can now pay their bills. The visual impact on a balance sheet or a pie chart is not the only measure of significance. And (B) It’s not as if all these jobs and dollars are scattered evenly across the state, 10 jobs in Sacramento, 10 in Bakersfield, etc. This industry is heavily concentrated in one or two cities.

          • n24rc

            You clarify the issue as for local economies, for which I’ve already pointed out: 40 permits were filed, a deficit below the industry norm – LA didn’t blink, as it has several industries outside of porn. LA has tourism, mainstream Entertainment, plus the real estate market which has relatively stabilized. There are larger economic threats to even local markets, than condom requirements in porn.

            So that leaves your second city? Where is this place- is It Pornoville, California, USA? 😀

            Will Pornoville survive the devastating effects of wrapping dicks up in a plastic sheath?

          • moondoggy

            I was thinking of West Hollywood, to answer your question. I replied to your previous points mostly for the sake of others who might be reading this. But I doubt many other people are anymore, and you come across as close-minded, so we’ll have to agree to disagree.

          • n24rc

            West Hollywood doesn’t need porn to keep running. So we can assume it will be fine when they leave.

  • Todd

    I enjoy the interviews you’re doing, Zach. Hope to see more. Haven’t seen any of Sean’s work, but now have some interest to check him out (that is what a good interview does !)

  • n24rc

    “Sometimes I get bored and like to antagonize the masses.”

    Uh, “Sometimes” !?!? – LMAO

  • Hi Presley

    One of the best porn interviews I have read. You asked him great questions and amazingly his answers are solid and articulate.

    • moondoggy

      Agreed on all levels.

  • Kika

    Good interview!!! Thx for inviting Sean Zevran for that great interview!!!! He’s very inteligent! Kisses from Japan!

  • Colorful Kent

    The problem with gay4pay is the messages is send about straights being hotter than gays (masculinity) and redefining the idea of sexual orientation which many of us have fought long and hard for. It’s the LGBT community there isn’t a $ at the end. G4$ models think of gay sex as a fetish not an orientation. They shame gay sex and deprive of authentic experiences. He’d rather work with gay models. I’d rather see them. We need some straight free zones. Lots of homophobia all around. It would be such a shame for straight guys to have suffer getting paid less than women or gay men in this industry. Don’t they always have to come out on top!

  • BlkManLuvsPorn

    I anxiously await Sean doing bareback porn and working with more men of color!

  • Ale Lisboa

    I love it

  • Zealot

    Great interview. And I’m a big fan of Sean– have been since his debut at Randy Blue.

    I don’t want to be all judge-y about his comments on barebacking and Truvada. It’s his life after all. It’s just with someone so intelligent (he himself recognizes the risks, and admits in the interview that Truvada isn’t meant to replace condoms)….so why take such unwarranted chances?

  • Jim Steele

    Great interview. Wonderful man.

  • MIke

    With all due respect, you have a very nice body, but you absolutely never smile when you go to the gym in Dallas. I’ve seen you there multiple times. And, you walk with such attitude like “your it”. Don’t get me wrong, but I think being a bit more social at the gym in Dallas would help your base of fans. Maybe it’s because you are on your smart phone a lot…understandable…i see a lot of guys do that…but seeing the interviews online and seeing you at the gym in a public setting is totally different….I’m just saying a SMILE goes a long way with making a hot guy like yourself…even hotter….And, I’m not mistaken it’s you…only figured it out after seeing you on one of the Gay Apps….close to me…..you input sean.zevran…..Thanks.

  • Pepo

    Con ese cuerpazo y esos muslos tan fuertes, le imagino sobre mí, sujetándome con fuerza, mientras introduce su poderosa verga de 22 cms. gruesa y dura como la piedra, hasta el fondo de mi culo para follarme con fuerza.

  • Terry

    This is a great interview. It paints him with a 3 dimensional brush as opposed to just fulfilling the fantasy many of us have of porn starts. It humanized him.

    Despite the mess about the condom law, those who usually bareback with one person may tend to bareback with others and become HIV+. I think the law is actually a moral kneejerk reaction than anything else